Jim Facette steps down as president and CEO of CBAA

A little more than two months into his term as president and CEO of the Canadian Business Aviation Association (CBAA), Jim Facette is stepping down.

Jim Facette head and shoulders photo
Jim Facette joined the Canadian Business Aviation Association on Dec. 1, 2017. He is also a former president and CEO of the Canadian Airports Council. CBAA Photo
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The CBAA said in an email to its members on Monday that Facette and the CBAA board “had different visions” for the future direction of the organization.

He tendered his resignation and the board accepted it, the email said. His resignation became effective on Friday, Feb. 9, 2018.

“We appreciate the work Jim has carried out during his tenure with the CBAA, and thank him for his service,” said board chairman Rod Barnard in a statement issued on Monday.

Facette had been in the position since Dec. 1, 2017, succeeding Rudy Toering, who was planning to retire. Toering has accepted the role of interim president and CEO as the search begins for a new successor, said Barnard.

Rudy Toering wearing suit and tie
Rudy Toering will serve as interim president and CEO until a new successor is found. CBAA Photo

The board expects the successor to be in place for the CBAA 2018 convention and exhibition, which runs from June 12 to 14 in Waterloo, Ont.

“The board appreciates having Rudy’s proven leadership and sound industry knowledge in helping further the interests of the CBAA membership during this transitionary period,” said Barnard.

“As you know, Rudy has been active on CBAA’s most critical files, such as the imposition of taxable benefits by the Canada Revenue Agency related to the legitimate business use of corporate aircraft, and the regulatory one-size-fits-all proposals from Transport Canada related to flight and duty times.

“His expertise on these and other issues, and his commitment to business aviation and the CBAA will be invaluable as we move forward together.”

Facette, a former CEO of the Canadian Airports Council (CAC), told Skies in November that he saw joining the CBAA as an opportunity to return to aviation.

“I thoroughly enjoyed my time and the people I had a chance to interact with when I was the CEO of the Canadian Airports Council,” he said at the time.

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“I got to know the many parts of aviation in Canada, from the regulatory and policy makers, to all the stakeholders, including business aviation, that make up the broader industry.”

He cited a desire to have a positive impact on business aviation in Canada when asked about his main goals for his time with the CBAA.

“That comes back to where business operators know they can conduct business with a policy and regulatory environment that is business-friendly,” he said.

“Where it pertains to the CBAA, I look at membership growth, increasing public and government awareness on the importance of business aviation, and more generally just building on past successes. It’s important we build and maintain strong relationships with elected and unelected government officials.”

He listed coming to a resolution on flight and duty times, taxation of the personal use of business aircraft, and the pilot shortage, as specific issues he hoped to address during his term.

Toering served as president and CEO of the CBAA starting in 2013. He was recognized for his efforts on behalf of the industry in Canada, and internationally, with the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)’s Silk Scarf Award in 2017.

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