CAE, Jazz and Seneca launch Canadian cadet pilot training program

CAE, Jazz Aviation, and Seneca have teamed up to develop Jazz Approach, an innovative Canadian program to provide Jazz with a pipeline of top-quality first officers. Cadets will receive a letter of employment from Jazz upon selection into the program, allowing for a direct path to join the airline as first officers conditional upon successful completion of the program. The parties involved have signed a five-year partnership agreement and the first cohort is set to begin training in April 2020.

CAE has been training Jazz Aviation's pilots in Canada since 2003, and under this new agreement with Seneca, CAE will help Jazz in the selection, training and certification of new pilots. CAE Photo
CAE has been training Jazz Aviation’s pilots in Canada since 2003, and under this new agreement with Seneca, CAE will help Jazz in the selection, training and certification of new pilots. CAE Photo
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“CAE creates over 1,500 new pilots yearly over 30 cadet training programs globally, and we are thrilled to add a first Canadian cadet pilot training program to our list of curricula,” said Nick Leontidis, CAE’s group president, Civil Aviation Training Solutions. “The demand for pilots has never been so high. With over 300,000 pilots needed globally over the next decade, CAE is working closely with airlines around the world to come up with pilot creation solutions. This program is a one-of-a-kind program, and a great example of how the Canadian aviation industry is working closely together to come up with innovative solutions to face that challenge. We thank Jazz for its trust, we are honored to help expand upon its pipeline of future pilots and we look forward to training them alongside Seneca.”

Jazz Aviation’s pilots have been training in CAE’s network in Canada since 2003. Now, under this new agreement, with its partner Seneca, CAE will be assisting Jazz in the selection, training and certification of new pilots.

Under the Jazz Approach program, cadets will undergo airline transport pilot license training over 18 months at Seneca's School of Aviation, followed by CAE providing CRJ200 type rating at its Toronto facility. CAE Photo
Under the Jazz Approach program, cadets will undergo airline transport pilot license training over 18 months at Seneca’s School of Aviation, followed by CAE providing CRJ200 type rating at its Toronto facility. CAE Photo

“We are very excited to partner with two exceptional Canadian organizations, CAE and Seneca, to introduce the Jazz Approach program,” said Capt Steve Linthwaite, vice-president, Flight Operations for Jazz Aviation. “For Jazz, this innovative initiative will be an expansion of our Jazz Aviation Pathways Program (Jazz APP) and provides yet another avenue for future generations of pilots to launch their careers in aviation. The roots of the Jazz APP program go back to 2007 and the addition of Jazz Approach is an important step in growing the program to yet another level. We have worked with both CAE and Seneca for many years and we are delighted to have the opportunity to join together to introduce this program in Canada.”

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“We are thrilled to be partnering with CAE and Jazz Aviation through this innovative all-Canadian collaboration. The Jazz Approach program builds on the success of our partnership with Jazz Aviation and will be an excellent addition to the suite of academic and hands-on training offered within our School of Aviation,” said Lynne McMullen, director of strategic partnerships with Seneca’s School of Aviation. “The Jazz Approach program is another opportunity for Seneca to be on the forefront of flight training in Canada.”

About the Jazz Approach program

CAE, Jazz and Seneca developed the Jazz Approach program in close collaboration, showcasing the latest competency-based training innovations. The Jazz Approach program embeds Jazz Aviation standard operating procedures (SOPs) and threat and error management strategies. Under the terms of this program, CAE will conduct recruitment, assessment and selection of the cadets according to Jazz’s defined criteria. The cadets will undergo the integrated airline transport pilot license (ATPL) training over 18 months at Seneca’s School of Aviation in Peterborough, Ont. Following completion, CAE will provide a CRJ200 type rating at CAE Toronto, leveraging CAE’s innovative training equipment. Upon successful completion of the training program and subject to certain conditions, the first graduates will join Jazz Aviation as first officers by the end of 2021. Applications for the Jazz Approach training program will open on Dec. 1, 2019.

11 thoughts on “CAE, Jazz and Seneca launch Canadian cadet pilot training program

  1. $130,000 to get a $40,000 a year job? I don’t see how this will encourage young pilots or females to become pilots. This relies heavily on having rich parents as banks will not lend for this. There are plenty of 600 hour pilots looking to get into the regionals and instead Jazz has decided to raise the barrier to entry. Disappointing move.

  2. Hi, it sounds really great. I have one question though: Can a foreigner with Permanent Residency apply for this?? I mean, there’s a chance to be chosen??

  3. More inexperienced pilots in the flight deck of transport aircraft is not the answer. Those new pilots should have to go out there and fly small planes to get the required EXPERIENCE before moving onto largely automated airplanes. You’re creating a culture of shit pilots. Accidents waiting to happen. Well done.

  4. $126,000 to enrol in the program? And be tied for 5 years to Jazz? An innovative Canadian approach? What an absolute joke. How is this going to help gain more pilots for the future..
    There are some European flight schools with incredible flight school programs with direct entry to first officer and is entirely funded by the airline, Which bonds you to that airline for a number of years.
    And this is Canada’s innovative step to hire more pilots? Okey then…..
    Someone please tel me if I am misunderstanding something here.

  5. The only innovative approach is when airlines step up to the plate and take on the flight school fees for the right students.

    By having costs of $126,000 for students to enrol, you limit the pool of cadets to rich families only. Where’s the diversity…

    There is no innovation and it is an old fashioned method.

    Disgraceful if you ask me.

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